fbpx

2020 Schedule

New Frontier Emergency Medicine Symposium


Thursday

  • PRE-CON: Cadaver Lab (3 CE)

    Scott Lail, Holly Ilg, Janet Taylor, Dan Livengood

    Its 3am in the driving rain, your patient is trapped in an upside SUV, and their life depends on a skill you havent done since EMT or Paramedic school…in other words, \”the feces just hit the air mover.\”

    This exciting pre-conference course offers each participant, from EMR to Paramedic, the chance to have hands-on experience with a wide range of high acuity/low-frequency skills. The lab will incorporate fresh human specimens in conjunction with anatomical tracheas and lungs as well as mannequins to provide an environment to master basic and advanced skills. Participants will also gain an in-depth knowledge of BLS/ALS airway techniques, surgical cricothyrotomy, bleeding control, vascular access including IV, IO, and central line placement, ventilation management with needle decompression, and thoracostomy. 

    The faculty brings with them decades of experience and the many tricks and tips they have learned along the way. Regardless of certification level, every provider will gain new knowledge and a greater appreciation for the human body and the art of EMS!

    Learner Objectives:

  • Describe the benefits of a human specimen training lab.
  • Compare and contrast a simple pneumothorax vs. a tension pneumothorax.
  • Understand the risk vs. benefit of different types of airway adjuncts.
  • Demonstrate proper tourniquet application.
  • Learn something new and have fun!
  • Limit 30 per class

    PreCon Advanced Registration required for this session.

  • PRE-CON: Peer-to-Peer Counseling Course (4 CE)

    Brenda Tillman

    Peer-to-Peer Counseling: Building Strength In Your People and Yourself

    Trauma in the Emergency Medical Provider community is a guarantee. Suicides in first responder communities surpassed line of duty deaths last year. It’s time we promote methods for building strength after trauma. Join Dr. Brenda Tillman, Dr. Erika Sallee, Ben and Scott in this interactive session identifying solutions so that trauma “doesn\’t become too much”. No taboo topics, just resources and solutions for improving your personal and organizational readiness gap to create space for joy in life.

    Solution Focused Peer Support:

    This presentation offers an opportunity for medical personnel and first responders to open discussions about how to best promote wellness in their strong, culturally specific communities. The participants will discuss effective peer programs and the techniques that build strengths while being impacted by continuous trauma. Discussions of professional and paraprofessional responses and techniques will open concepts and understanding.

    The workshop will focus on the concept of an RG Community and will integrate a Solution-Focused Peer-to-Peer Process, that will be reviewed in a brief didactic component:

    Engage and Align

    Listen to the story (sensory experience)

    Use communication skills to engage conversation (reflecting, paraphrasing, extrapolation, “what else”

    Shift to solutions (strength and resource building/exceptions)

    Scaling for goal awareness and achievement

    Learner Objectives:

    Participants will:

    Gain insight into trauma and how we process and store it.

    Discuss Post-traumatic Stress Disorder/Injury and effective techniques that mitigate impact and symptoms.

    Gain an understanding of and practice with the solution-focused peer-to-peer process.

    Be introduced to the coping quotient concept and discuss how to promote posttraumatic growth after trauma.

    Participants will recognize how the tenets of solution-focused practice change peer support.

    Be introduced to an effective structure for comprehensive well-being programs in the Emergency Medical Provider community.

    Will practice the peer-to-peer process.

    Limit 20 per class
    PreCon Advanced Registration required for this session.

  • PRE-CON: Hands-On Rescue Course – TRAPPED! (4 CE)

    Justin Capaul

    Hands On Rescue Pre-Con Course

    People get themselves into precarious situations sometimes. This class covers some of the techniques necessary to provide care and remove a patient from these situations. Students will be face with five pits that will sharpen their problem-solving and teamwork skills. Skills include ring removal, arm in pipe, hand in a roller press, and several more! Hands-on use of tools is required for every pit.

    PPE required – each attendee is to bring their own gloves and eye protection.

    All participants MUST come prepared with the following:

  • Long pants, long sleeve shirt, enclosed shoes (no sandals, etc.)
  • Safety glasses
  • Gloves (wildland, leather, extrication, and utility gloves will all work)
  • Limit 24 per class. PreCon Advanced Registration required for this session.

  • PRE-CON: EKG and Rhythm Recognition Review (4 CE)

    Mark Sawdon, Dan Schwartz

    12 Lead EKG and rhythm recognition are among the many cornerstones to your care when treating patients. Do you feel like you would like to review and test your knowledge as well as learn some of the advanced interpretation techniques? During this course we will cover the EKG fundamentals and beyond, quick interpretation of rhythms and injury patterns that require your immediate attention, interventions associated with specific rhythms and tools to build your foundation to 12-lead interpretation and injury pattern recognition. This will be a straight forward, case based presentation that is sure to give you tools to bring back to the bedside! 

    Learner Objectives:

    At the conclusion of this presentation the learner we be able to identify the components of a systematic approach to the interpretation of a basic EKG rhythm.

    At the conclusion of this presentation the learner will be able to identify the components of a systematic approach to the interpretation of a 12 Lead EKG.

    At the conclusion of this presentation the learner we be able to identify how to apply the systematic approach to interpretation into the differential diagnosis for their patient and identify several of the atypical 12 Lead presentations.

  • It's All About the Kids (8 CE)

    Tracy Cleary

    Tiffany Mullen, MSN, RN, ACCNS-P, CCRN

    This PRECON session is ALL ABOUT THE KIDS!

    Pediatric patients tend to get our heart rate up and increase anxiety. What are the red flags? Does a congenital defect change or even alter patient assessment? What does the latest research show us about treatment modalities? Let’s slow things down and take a look at pediatric medical emergencies, the challenges of disaster treatment and management, and get our hands on devices and equipment. You are going to walk away from this session empowered and more confident to provide the best care to your smallest of patients!

    Learner Objectives:

    The participant should be able to identify JumpStart criteria for triage in disasters.

    The participant should be able to perform a triage activity utilizing JumpStart triage.

    The participant should be able to recall pediatric cardiac anomalies.

    The participant should be able to identify system(s) impact of pediatric medical emergencies.

    The participant should be able to solve pediatric medication dosing calculations.

    The participant should be able to solve pediatric fluid resuscitation calculations.

    The participant should be able to integrate current research to their own pediatric emergency medical care.

    Limit 30 per class PreCon Advanced Registration required for this session.

  • PRE-CON: Cadaver Lab (3 CE)

    Scott Lail, Holly Ilg, Janet Taylor, Dan Livengood

    Its 3am in the driving rain, your patient is trapped in an upside SUV, and their life depends on a skill you havent done since EMT or Paramedic school…in other words, \”the feces just hit the air mover.\”

    This exciting pre-conference course offers each participant, from EMR to Paramedic, the chance to have hands-on experience with a wide range of high acuity/low-frequency skills. The lab will incorporate fresh human specimens in conjunction with anatomical tracheas and lungs as well as mannequins to provide an environment to master basic and advanced skills. Participants will also gain an in-depth knowledge of BLS/ALS airway techniques, surgical cricothyrotomy, bleeding control, vascular access including IV, IO, and central line placement, ventilation management with needle decompression, and thoracostomy. 

    The faculty brings with them decades of experience and the many tricks and tips they have learned along the way. Regardless of certification level, every provider will gain new knowledge and a greater appreciation for the human body and the art of EMS!

    Learner Objectives:

  • Describe the benefits of a human specimen training lab.
  • Compare and contrast a simple pneumothorax vs. a tension pneumothorax.
  • Understand the risk vs. benefit of different types of airway adjuncts.
  • Demonstrate proper tourniquet application.
  • Learn something new and have fun!
  • Limit 30 per class

    PreCon Advanced Registration required for this session.

  • PRE-CON: Cadaver Lab (3 CE)

    Scott Lail, Holly Ilg, Janet Taylor, Dan Livengood

    Its 3am in the driving rain, your patient is trapped in an upside SUV, and their life depends on a skill you havent done since EMT or Paramedic school…in other words, \”the feces just hit the air mover.\”

    This exciting pre-conference course offers each participant, from EMR to Paramedic, the chance to have hands-on experience with a wide range of high acuity/low-frequency skills. The lab will incorporate fresh human specimens in conjunction with anatomical tracheas and lungs as well as mannequins to provide an environment to master basic and advanced skills. Participants will also gain an in-depth knowledge of BLS/ALS airway techniques, surgical cricothyrotomy, bleeding control, vascular access including IV, IO, and central line placement, ventilation management with needle decompression, and thoracostomy. 

    The faculty brings with them decades of experience and the many tricks and tips they have learned along the way. Regardless of certification level, every provider will gain new knowledge and a greater appreciation for the human body and the art of EMS!

    Learner Objectives:

  • Describe the benefits of a human specimen training lab.
  • Compare and contrast a simple pneumothorax vs. a tension pneumothorax.
  • Understand the risk vs. benefit of different types of airway adjuncts.
  • Demonstrate proper tourniquet application.
  • Learn something new and have fun!
  • Limit 30 per class

    PreCon Advanced Registration required for this session.

  • Sip with the Speakers

    Join us for appetizers and a no-host bar, meet other Symposium attendees, sponsors, exhibitors and connect with the 2020 Symposium speakers to kick off the Symposium this year!

    Sip with the Speakers ticket included for attendees who are registered for Thursday sessions. Guest tickets can be purchased as a guest pass.

Thurs. (cont.)

  • PRE-CON: NAEMT Trauma First Responder Course (8 CE)

    Bill Justice

    PHTLS for First Responders Provider Course: Is an exciting 8-hour classroom course for first responders including emergency medical responders (EMR), firefighters, rescue personnel and law enforcement officers. This program offers the most up to date information in trauma care along with fun, interactive hands on skill stations. Dress comfortable and come energized for this valuable training event. Upon successful completion of this course, students receive a certificate of completion, a wallet card good for 4 years and 8 hours of CAPCE credit. Limit 30 per class PreCon Advanced Registration required for this session.

  • Leadership Enhancement and Development – Just Culture ( 8 CE)

    Matthew Streger, Rob Luckritz Medical errors are the third leading cause of death in the United States. Rather than learning from mistakes, people are taught to hide errors, and the punitive culture of progressive discipline does nothing to help. This lecture will demonstrate how to implement a culture of learning, making better risk-benefit decisions, and improving our overall system. Developing Leadership Pre-Con Course Understand concepts of Just Culture and the scope of medical error problems Understand three categories of decisions that people make Understand learning actions associated with each decision category Limit 30 per class PreCon Advanced Registration required for this session.

  • PRE-CON: Hands-On Rescue Course – TRAPPED! (4 CE)

    Justin Capaul

    Hands On Rescue Pre-Con Course

    People get themselves into precarious situations sometimes. This class covers some of the techniques necessary to provide care and remove a patient from these situations. Students will be face with five pits that will sharpen their problem-solving and teamwork skills. Skills include ring removal, arm in pipe, hand in a roller press, and several more! Hands-on use of tools is required for every pit.

    PPE required – each attendee is to bring their own gloves and eye protection.

    All participants MUST come prepared with the following:

  • Long pants, long sleeve shirt, enclosed shoes (no sandals, etc.)
  • Safety glasses
  • Gloves (wildland, leather, extrication, and utility gloves will all work)
  • Limit 24 per class. PreCon Advanced Registration required for this session.

  • PRE-CON: The Fabrication of Cardiac Arrest Resuscitation (4 CE)

    Mark Sawdon, Dan Schwartz

    During this 4-hour pre-conference course we will build your organized, systematic, pre-determined, positional assignment approach to a patient in cardiac arrest. This evidence based approach will allow everyone the opportunity to operate and participate in multiple mock resuscitations, building your confidence in your participation in providing care to a patient in cardiac arrest. Join me for this vital hands on opportunity!

    Learner Objectives:

    1. At the conclusion of this presentation the learner will be able to identify the positional assignments necessary when conducting a cardiac arrest resuscitation.

    2. At the conclusion of this presentation the learner will be able to identify the most important interventions necessary when conducting a cardiac arrest resuscitation.

    3. At the conclusion of this presentation the learner will be able to identify several items for implementation into their own systems of care in their home agencies.

    Limit 20 per class. PreCon Advanced Registration required for this session.

Friday

  • Registration and Continental Breakfast Available

    Ongoing registration and Continental Breakfast in the CDA Resort Conference Center.

  • General Session #1

    Ed Racht

    In the Coeur d\’Alene Resort Conference Center.

  • Break in Exhibit Area

  • General Session #3

    Will Krost

    When Our Paths Crossed

     
    This presentation will provide a unique clinical perspective that is only seen in the rarest of circumstances.  This lecture is sure to tug at your emotional heartstrings, while satisfying your clinical needs. This session will discuss the reality of what we do and provide answers to the questions that you’ve always asked but never gotten answered.  

     Learner Objectives:

        1.  Understand the pathophysiology of Crush injuries and Compartment syndromes. 

        2. Identify clinical assessment findings associated with crush injuries and compartment syndromes.

        3. Understand the initial field treatment for crush injuries and compartment syndromes.

        4. Identify classic and controversial definitive care treatment modalities.

  • Lunch Break

    On Your Own.

  • Physician/APP Breakout Session

    Rick Hunt

    Triage: Life or Death Decisions

    Triage. From Merriam-Webster, “French, sorting, sifting, from trier to sort, from Old French.” Triage is used for daily occurring emergencies. It’s also used on battlefields and during disasters to maximize the numbers of survivors. This session will review current approaches and how recent experience with overwhelming numbers of casualties requires us to take a hard new look at triage.

    Learner Objectives:

    1. Know the definition of triage

    2. Know the differences between triage for daily occurring emergencies and for disasters

    3. Describe the impact of overwhelming no-notice trauma on triage

  • An Extraordinary Mind

    Janet Taylor

    Mental Health Awareness is becoming a hot topic due to the lack of access to counseling and inpatient beds available for those afflicted with a mental illness. This presentation is a basic overview of the most common types of mental illness we may see in an EMS / Fire setting. Depression, Suicidal Ideation, Schizophrenia, Bi-Polar and the reactions we may see with medications such as Catatonia and Dystonic Reaction. The overall intention of this presentation is to help providers understand what someone with a mental illness has to deal with on a daily basis and gain a different perspective on the challenges they face.

    Learner Objectives:

    1. List at least three ways to develop a rapport with a patient who has a mental illness

    2. Define “Support System”

    3. List at least two alterations in your body language when having a conversation with your patient

    4. Differentiate between Hallucinations and Delusions

    5. Define “Decompensation” and “Escalating”

    6. List the three things to evaluate when someone with Suicidal Ideation says he/she has a plan.

    7. List the criteria for defining the cycles of Bi-Polar

    8. Understand why patients who have a mental illness are reluctant or unable to get the help they need including counseling, emergency access or medications.

  • Physician / APP Breakout Session

    Will Krost

    Burns, Burns, and More Burns

    Burn management has consistently been one of the most controversial topics in all of emergency care. With an increase in the frequency of blast injuries in the world and an increasing threat in the United States as a result of terrorism, it should be assumed that there will also be an increase in burn related injuries. This program is designed to provide the learner with the knowledge necessary to effectively and safely assess and manage patients various burn-related injuries

    Learner Objectives:

    1. Recall the anatomy & physiology of the skin.

    2. Develop an understanding of burn injuries from thermal (heat) sources and (depending upon presentation length) burns from electrical, chemical, and radiation sources.

    3. Perform appropriate initial and focused assessments of burn injuries, including realistically accurate burn depth and extent estimations.

    4. Provide appropriate medical and psychological treatment for burn injuries, including decontamination and IV fluid administration.

    5. Make appropriate destination decisions based upon the burn mechanism, injury extent, and patient condition.

  • A Change of Heart CHF

    Janet Taylor

    More information coming soon.

  • Critical Care Ventilator Management

    Dom Pomponio

    An introduction to effective invasive and non-invasive oxygenation and ventilation management for the rural provider.

    Learner Objectives:

    1. Understand the dynamics between different ventilation modes including invasive and non-invasive techniques.

    2. Demonstrate knowledge of effective oxygenation strategies using PEEP.

    3. Understand the differences in management between shunt and mechanical physiology of the respiratory failure patient.

    4. Demonstrate the initial and ongoing ventilator settings for the acutely critically ill patient.

  • Break in Exhibit Area

  • General Session #5

    Allen Wolfe

    More information coming soon.

Fri. (cont.)

  • Welcome & Introductions

    In the Coeur d Alene Resort Conference Center.

  • General Session #2

    Rick Hunt

    Lessons From and Unlikely Journey

    This session will describe the challenges and successes of a professional journey from the ER to the Situation Room. Caring for one patient at a time in the ER will be compared with caring for many will be compared and contrasted.

    Learner Objectives:

    1. Compare skill sets needed for care of individual patients compared with those needed for care of the public

    2. Describe career options for emergency care provider

    3. Know how emergency care skills can be applied to national and international disaster responses

  • Advanced 12-Lead Interpretation, A Case Based Approach

    Mark Sawdon, Dan Schwartz

    12 lead interpretation has quickly become the standard of care for both pre-hospital and in-hospital providers. Do you feel like you have a pretty solid foundation to your 12 lead assessment? Do you feel like you can identify many of the injury patterns with your systematic approach? If the answer is yes, I would like to invite you to join me for an informative, cased based, interactive presentation specifically crafted for the experienced provider. The ideal course attendee will have a solid systematic approach to reading a 12 Lead, possess the basic knowledge of medications delivered during cardiac events and a strong understanding of basic rhythms and the anatomy of the heart and coronary vessels. This will be a fast paced presentation chalked full of actual 12 leads from real patient encounters!

    Learner Objectives:

    1. At the conclusion of this presentation the learner we be able to identify the components of a systematic approach to the interpretation of a 12 Lead EKG.

    2. At the conclusion of this presentation the learner we be able to identify how to apply the systematic approach to interpretation into the differential diagnosis for their patient.

    3. At the conclusion of this presentation the learner will be able to apply the “lessons learned” to their own practice.

  • Egos and Airways: The Misconception of Airway Management

    Dan Livengood

    This talk will take you down a 30 year EMS career with all the ups and downs, kills and saves, laughs and cries… All with my good friend – My Ego. How my ego controlled my career and was essential for my job satisfaction. What changed?

    Learner Objectives:

    1. How to critically think each airway.

    2. How to manage your airway ego and not let it manage you.

    3. How to recognize your mistakes and embrace them.

  • EMS Social Media Issues

    Matthew Streger

    Social media presents a clear and present issue in the workplace for every EMS provider. This lecture will address some of the pitfalls associated with social media use, including use of photo or video recording, HIPAA and NLRB issues, regulating off-duty conduct, and discrimination and harassment. We will use real-world examples, and will provide recommendations for best practices for providers and agencies, including model policy elements.

    Learner Objectives:

    1. Describe legal issues surrounding social media compliance

    2. Understand policy best practices regarding social media

    3. Describe common social media danger areas

  • BLS – Sepsis: What Your Control Doc Wishes You Knew

    Dan Schwartz

    Learner Objectives:

    The learner will be able to understand the differences between Infection VS Sepsis VS Code Sepsis

    The learner will be able to define Sepsis

    The learner will be able to understand the Spectrum of Sepsis

    The learner will be able to understand the high mortality rates related to Sepsis

    The learner will be able to understand the concept of the Cascade of Effects of Sepsis progression

    The learner will be able to understand organ systems effected by Sepsis and the related signs

    The learner will be able to relate Sepsis findings to patient presentations

    The learner will be able to apply the skill of Differential Diagnosis related to presentation

    The learner will be able to understand Sepsis and its impact upon the Pediatric patient

    The learner will be able to understand and apply points of Patient Management

  • General Topics Breakout Session

    Speakers TBA

  • Look How Far We've Come

    Matthew Streger

    Over the past 40 years, the field of EMS has made some dramatic strides, especially in the quality of medical care we provide. But a deeper look at our industry shows that we have not made as much progress as we think. This lecture will look at some critical areas in EMS, such as workplace violence, patient movement, opioids, provider wellness, lights and sirens use, boundary issues, and harassment and see what progress we have made. To help illustrate these points, we will look through the lens of cinema using the masterpiece “Mother, Jugs, and Speed.”

    Learner Objectives: 

    1. Describe changes that have occurred in EMS systems over the past 40 years

    2.Understand current challenges faced by EMS system leaders

    3. Understand future changes to be made in EMS systems design and compliance

  • Social Cruise

    Enjoy snacks and a no-host bar, visit with attendees, speakers, sponsors and exhibitors as we take a two-hour cruise around beautiful Lake Coeur d\’Alene!  Board at 6:00pm, cruise 6:30pm-8:30pm.

    Cruise ticket included for attendees who are registered for Friday sessions. Guest tickets can be purchased as a guest pass.

Saturday

  • Registration and Continental Breakfast Available

  • Walk Cool

    L.T. Arnold

    There are moments when one has a choice of how to perceive something.  Is this a challenge or is this a hard stop?  Can it be done or can it not?  Will it be a barrier or will it be an opportunity? Looking for those answers can lead to lots of different voices – yours and those around you – and they all hold influence over your approach.

    WALK COOL uses a personal case study to explore how adversity combined with different perceptions – both internal and external, positive and negative – can shape, limit, and empower all of us to do what we can do, and to do it REALLY well.

    Learner Objectives:

    1. Identify opportunities to shift perceptions, remove barriers, and encourage success

    2. Discuss the effects of positive thinking, positive influences and positive role models when faced with challenges and negative self-talk

    3. Explore biases in methods for evaluating performance effectiveness

    4. Illustrate the strength of teamwork, community, and family in developing resiliency

  • Break in Exhibit Area

  • Whole Blood – A Lifesaving Therapy

    Craig Manifold

    Whole Blood: A lifesaving therapy.

    Current trauma resuscitation strategies are renewing the interest in whole blood. We will review the history of whole blood administration, current treatment for hemorrhagic shock, address the myths associated with giving cold stored low titer O+ blood, and most importantly review the logistics of implementing a whole blood program in your agency and region.

    Learner Objectives:

    Review historical use of whole blood in the civilian and battlefield environments

    Discuss hemorrhagic shock therapies used in the prehospital setting

    Identify current LTOWB transfusion strategies

    Highlight logistics issues when implementing whole blood therapy in your trauma system

  • I've Got A Crush On You

    Janet Taylor

    More information coming soon.

  • Gimme Some Sugar

    It’s a common occurrence for EMS to respond to Diabetes emergencies.  With the increasing prevalence of diabetes in our society, it’s just going to get more common!  Whether it’s Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes, there can be more to these patients than meets the eye!  

    In this presentation, we take both types of diabetes apart.  We not only talk about what we see as emergency responders, but also about what’s going on physiologically and psychologically from the perspective of the diabetic.  We gain a greater appreciation of the complexities of diabetes care, as well as a simplified approach for treating all types of diabetes-related emergencies.  

    This class is intended for First Responders, EMT’s, Paramedics, and RN’s.  Taught by a diabetic, with interactive discussion and first-hand examples, this lecture will have you walking away with all the mystery taken out of Diabetes Management.  

    Learner Objectives:

    Understand the physiology of diabetes – Both Type 1 and 2

    Physiologically distinguish diabetic coma from insulin shock

    Describe the signs/symptoms of each

    Identify a true diabetic emergency

    Discuss appropriate treatments

  • Gimme Some Sugar

    It’s a common occurrence for EMS to respond to Diabetes emergencies.  With the increasing prevalence of diabetes in our society, it’s just going to get more common!  Whether it’s Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes, there can be more to these patients than meets the eye!  

    In this presentation, we take both types of diabetes apart.  We not only talk about what we see as emergency responders, but also about what’s going on physiologically and psychologically from the perspective of the diabetic.  We gain a greater appreciation of the complexities of diabetes care, as well as a simplified approach for treating all types of diabetes-related emergencies.  

    This class is intended for First Responders, EMT’s, Paramedics, and RN’s.  Taught by a diabetic, with interactive discussion and first-hand examples, this lecture will have you walking away with all the mystery taken out of Diabetes Management.  

    Learner Objectives:

    Understand the physiology of diabetes – Both Type 1 and 2

    Physiologically distinguish diabetic coma from insulin shock

    Describe the signs/symptoms of each

    Identify a true diabetic emergency

    Discuss appropriate treatments

  • Gimme Some Sugar

    It’s a common occurrence for EMS to respond to Diabetes emergencies.  With the increasing prevalence of diabetes in our society, it’s just going to get more common!  Whether it’s Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes, there can be more to these patients than meets the eye!  

    In this presentation, we take both types of diabetes apart.  We not only talk about what we see as emergency responders, but also about what’s going on physiologically and psychologically from the perspective of the diabetic.  We gain a greater appreciation of the complexities of diabetes care, as well as a simplified approach for treating all types of diabetes-related emergencies.  

    This class is intended for First Responders, EMT’s, Paramedics, and RN’s.  Taught by a diabetic, with interactive discussion and first-hand examples, this lecture will have you walking away with all the mystery taken out of Diabetes Management.  

    Learner Objectives:

    Understand the physiology of diabetes – Both Type 1 and 2

    Physiologically distinguish diabetic coma from insulin shock

    Describe the signs/symptoms of each

    Identify a true diabetic emergency

    Discuss appropriate treatments

  • Physician / APP Breakout Session

    Ed Racht

    More information coming soon.

  • Military Prehospital Care and Its Impact on Civilian EMS

    Craig Manifold

    Military Prehospital Care and Its impact on Civilian EMS

    During the recent battles in Iraq and Afghanistan many innovations have been utilized to decrease the morbidity and mortality of the battlefield. These strategies have been translated to civilian and are improving the care provided to our patients back home.

    We will review the devices, education and training enhancements as well as look to the future and see what may impact the future of civilian EMS.

    Learner Objectives:

    1. Review devices and therapies utilized for hemorrhage control

    2. Identify airway management strategies which are successful in the field

    3. Identify education and training enhancements— certification and licensure

    4.  Analyze current military research and  project what the future may bring to civilian EMS

  • All Bleeding Stops…Eventually: Bleeding Control

    Janet Taylor

    In response to the increase in frequency of bombings and mass shootings, there is a recognized need to treat uncontrolled bleeding in order to increase survivability among the victims of such disasters. There is a highly regarded program called, “Stop the Bleed” which is being taught all over the US with great success. This presentation spins off from that and goes a little more in depth on what works (and what doesn’t). It also goes beyond just pressure dressings and tourniquets and lists the qualities of a good hemostatic agent and tourniquet. Basically, what works and what doesn’t and WHY. Also discussed is Tranexamic Acid (TXA) and why it is making a comeback.

    Learner Objectives:

    1. List the differences between Military and Civilian trauma injuries

    2. Analyze at least two desirable qualities that are preferred in a tourniquet

    3. Compare the preferred type of hemostatic agent to other types and determine why some work better than the other types

    4. Analyze at least 3 desirable qualities of a hemostatic agent

    5. Understand the concept of “Damage Control Resuscitation”

  • Critical Care Breakout

    More information coming soon.

  • Panel Discussion

    Allen Wolfe, Craig Manifold, Ed Racht

    More information coming soon.

  • Break in Exhibit Area

  • I Am Alive Because of You

    Rod Landrum

    Rod will emphasize and articulate the deep appreciation he has for EMS and the trauma teams that saved his life. He recognizes and acknowledges all the help he received that has made it possible for him to return to a normal life. Rod will share his story and how…..A positive attitude greatly affects a positive medical outcome!

    Learner Objectives:

    1. Trauma Systems

    2. Continued training

Sat. (cont.)

  • The Unwelcome Family Reunion: Hypothermia, Acidosis, and Coagulopathy

    Allen Wolfe

    Trauma is the major cause of death worldwide. The trauma triad of death is a term describing the combination of hypothermia, acidosis and coagulopathy. This combination is commonly seen in patients who have sustained severe traumatic injuries and results in a significant rise in the mortality rate.  The three conditions share a complex relationship; each factor can compound the others, resulting in high mortality if the cycle continues uninterrupted. The vicious cycle of the trauma triad should be intercepted and subsequently physiological imbalance corrected by resuscitation. The relationship between hypothermia, the degree of shock (acidosis) and to the development of coagulopathy produces increases the mortality by 90.

    OBJECTIVES

    List the components of the Trauma Triad and focused areas of the nursing assessment.

    Describe the complex relationship between hypothermia, acidosis and coagulopathy.

    Analyze overt and covert patient data to drive resuscitation decisions at the bedside.

    Integrate laboratory data and evidence based practice in predicting outcomes.

  • When the Shunt Hits the Fan…Pediatric Cardiac Disorders

    Theresa Bowden

    Have you ever been dispatched to a call, to find a pediatric patient in distress with a “unknown cardiac history” and a surgical scar on their sternum? This class will review common pediatric cardiac conditions and discuss treatment modalities for EMS providers. 

    Learning Objectives:

    Recognize signs and symptoms of cardiac disorders in pediatric populations.

    Discuss management of pediatric cardiac patients in EMS.

    Review available resources for EMS providers responding to pediatric cardiac emergencies.

  • Lunch Break

    On your own.

  • Pull the Trigger

    Jess Fulkerson

    Decision Making in Airway Management

    Airway management is a skill even the newest EMT needs to master.  But even to the most seasoned EMS professionals, HOW to best accomplish airway management can be difficult.  This class will discuss the DECISION MAKING needed in order to evaluate a patient and decide to employ aggressive techniques, vs. using more conservative skills.

    It’s about patient evaluation, and applying your skills to those patients that need you the most.  We could just intubate everybody…but is that really necessary?

    Designed for First Responder, EMT, EMT-I, and Paramedics, this case-study presentation will provide and interactive environment where together we can explore when it’s best to “pull the trigger”.

    Learner Objectives:

    Define “difficult airways” and explore options for management

    Understand critical facets of patient assessment, pertinent to airway maintenance

    Discuss assessment tools currently used by EMS and how to best employ them

    Explore the attitude and judgment necessary to be confident and competent

  • Crichy! The Realities of Surgical Airway Access

    Stephen Rahm

    The pathway to mitigation of a true “can’t intubate, can’t oxygenate” situation is very short and very direct—a cricothyrotomy. Emergent surgical airway access via the cricothyroid membrane is a procedure that many paramedics will never perform in their career; are YOU the next one who will be faced with this task? The low-frequency, high-risk nature of this skill mandates absolute knowledge of the anatomy of the anterior neck, frequent practice, and procedural confidence. When cricothyrotomy fails, it is often the result of an inability to properly locate the anatomic structures of the larynx.

    This presentation explores the realities of cricothyrotomy in a manner that you have likely never seen before. Utilizing high-resolution cadaveric images, the anterior neck will be procedurally dissected and critical anatomic structures will be identified. A step-by-step approach—based on the latest evidence and best practices—will be followed in order to maximize your success in performing this time-sensitive, final option procedure. No patient should go to the morgue (for lack of an airway) without a hole in their neck!

    Learner Objectives:

    Recognize a true “can’t intubate, can’t ventilate” situation.

    Identify key anatomic landmarks of the anterior neck and larynx.

    Describe the various barriers to gaining emergent surgical airway access.

    Describe the current best practices in gaining emergent surgical airway access.

  • General Topics Breakout Session

    Rob Luckritz

  • Physician / APP Breakout Session

    More information coming soon.

  • Thoracic Trauma: The Emergent Truth

    Stephen Rahm

    Thoracic injuries are a common cause of untimely death; however, many of these deaths are preventable with prompt recognition and immediate treatment. Your understanding of the anatomy, as well as the lifesaving evidence that supports current interventions, is imperative. This presentation begins with a review of the “anatomic truth,” using cadaveric images that distinguish mythology from reality. Complimented by videos of actual injuries and high- resolution cadaveric images, the discussion continues with common (and not so common) clinical presentations, complications, and current management options.

    Session Objectives:

    Identify critical anatomy within the thoracic cavity.

    Recognize the signs and symptoms of lethal thoracic injuries.

    Understand current treatment strategies and the evidence that supports them.

  • Closing Remarks

    More information coming soon.

New Frontier Emergency Medicine reserves the right to use photos taken of participants during Symposium related events for future brochures and promotional materials for the Symposium.